Creating a New Environment 2017-02-06 20:42:00






Hope Wilson
Liminal Spaces and Research Identity
The construction of Introductory Composition Students as Researchers
By James P. Purdy and Joyce R. Walker


                                         Students Accumulative Research












Do we force students to research in ways that will push them out of their comfort zone? I do not agree with the text book that advocates " When students conduct academic research, in other words, the skills and strategies they bring with them to be retooled or abandoned for fear that they will pollute their academic work" I think enhancement of collective knowledge should be encouraged. The students' relationship with their accumulative academics must be factored into how they will embrace new research processes. I agree with " Maurice Kogan (2009:209), In his discussion of the relationship among academics, academic institutions, and larger social settings, offers this description of the forces that shape academic development; ,For development to be strong, it must be firmly rooted in the intellectual self-confidence of the disciplines and subject area to which academics belong. That is the context in which a sense of academic identity flourishes. In a confident academic systems, new knowledge is generated through accepted processes of discovery and testing and through following the logic of the issues being tackle" which maybe discovered by an educator on a case by case basis.

 

Cultivating the students accumulated research skills are essential to correcting their "understanding of the research identities.  Liminality, "coming from the Latin word for "threshold," is what anthropologist Arnold Van Gennep (1960-: 10-11) presents as the transitional step in rites of passage (between separation and incorporation). He asserts that "to cross the threshold," that is, to literally or figuratively pass through a liminal space, " to unite oneself with a "new world" as an educators incorporating additional research processes to enhance students accumulated knowledge may essential to a student's future research identity.

 

I am concerned with " Web sources can indeed be of "questionable legitimacy," Maimon, Peritz, and Yancey assert (2007: 207), but we find particularly troubling in these sources is that students are to leave behind rather than build on what they already know about navigating digital research spaces," which is also vital to their research identity. Academic libraries have secure and valuable research Web sites. If students get into the habit of “Positioning the library as the required starting place for academic work” it may present a more rewarding outcome.

 

Attempting to restructure a college student’s that has been born into the digital world digital research process may be difficult. Incorporating the library Web site into their already research process at some point may be structure enough. The student’s first composition research class in elementary school should be taught to use the library Web site and current research processes which should be reinforced on other research projects. I agree that “This goal can be achieved, however without forcing students to abandon the useful knowledge and skills that form their existing research identities. Students need to be able to make their own investigations into these practices and to understand the complexities and contradictions in ways that academic research practice create knowledge." and processes that are comfortable for them.









Creating a New Environment 2017-02-06 20:42:00






Hope Wilson
Liminal Spaces and Research Identity
The construction of Introductory Composition Students as Researchers
By James P. Purdy and Joyce R. Walker


                                         Students Accumulative Research












Do we force students to research in ways that will push them out of their comfort zone? I do not agree with the text book that advocates " When students conduct academic research, in other words, the skills and strategies they bring with them to be retooled or abandoned for fear that they will pollute their academic work" I think enhancement of collective knowledge should be encouraged. The students' relationship with their accumulative academics must be factored into how they will embrace new research processes. I agree with " Maurice Kogan (2009:209), In his discussion of the relationship among academics, academic institutions, and larger social settings, offers this description of the forces that shape academic development; ,For development to be strong, it must be firmly rooted in the intellectual self-confidence of the disciplines and subject area to which academics belong. That is the context in which a sense of academic identity flourishes. In a confident academic systems, new knowledge is generated through accepted processes of discovery and testing and through following the logic of the issues being tackle" which maybe discovered by an educator on a case by case basis.

 

Cultivating the students accumulated research skills are essential to correcting their "understanding of the research identities.  Liminality, "coming from the Latin word for "threshold," is what anthropologist Arnold Van Gennep (1960-: 10-11) presents as the transitional step in rites of passage (between separation and incorporation). He asserts that "to cross the threshold," that is, to literally or figuratively pass through a liminal space, " to unite oneself with a "new world" as an educators incorporating additional research processes to enhance students accumulated knowledge may essential to a student's future research identity.

 

I am concerned with " Web sources can indeed be of "questionable legitimacy," Maimon, Peritz, and Yancey assert (2007: 207), but we find particularly troubling in these sources is that students are to leave behind rather than build on what they already know about navigating digital research spaces," which is also vital to their research identity. Academic libraries have secure and valuable research Web sites. If students get into the habit of “Positioning the library as the required starting place for academic work” it may present a more rewarding outcome.

 

Attempting to restructure a college student’s that has been born into the digital world digital research process may be difficult. Incorporating the library Web site into their already research process at some point may be structure enough. The student’s first composition research class in elementary school should be taught to use the library Web site and current research processes which should be reinforced on other research projects. I agree that “This goal can be achieved, however without forcing students to abandon the useful knowledge and skills that form their existing research identities. Students need to be able to make their own investigations into these practices and to understand the complexities and contradictions in ways that academic research practice create knowledge." and processes that are comfortable for them.









Liminal spaces, research identity, and thought processes

research-identityThis week’s reading, “Liminal Spaces and Research Identity” by James Purdy and Joyce Walker was a roller coaster to say the least. Despite the fact that the article was long, drawn out, and quite boring I will say that there was some interesting material presented and I was actually engaged with in certain areas of the article. Now, there are definitely some points that I am still confused about (my brain is just not allowing me to connect the dots in some areas), and I am still a little foggy in terms of what liminality actually is in this context. I had to look the word up, and when I did, it was defined as being a threshold, or point of entering/beginning. I took that idea and used it to shape the way that I read the article and understand a “liminal space”. I appreciate the fact that it sounded as though Purdy and Walker were advocating for student researchers compared to what some other writers in the field have expressed (as so lovely portrayed in all the citations we see Purdy and Walker using, displaying what others have done in their research and what they have reported). To be quite honest, I was angered through most of the article. Not only am I mad that I am just now learning about research identities, but I am also worried that this can still be an issue in 2017 (this article was written in 2012).

I suppose I understand that everything is a process, and nothing is ever fixed overnight or in the blink of an eye, but I guess I thought we would be further along. Students are still instructed today to forget everything that they learned in high school or prior, and to conform to what the university says is acceptable. I see and hear stories everyday about professors coming up with their own way to interpret a particular practice/set of practices, which ultimately ends up leaving a student confused and in the wrong state of mind. And what is up with that word pollute? I am still a student myself, and just reading the word in this article as a way to describe first-year comp students hurt my feelings. Purdy and Walker’s urge to discontinue terminology like this, and to focus more so on encouraging students and allowing them to see themselves in a way they may have never thought they could reminds me of an article from Dr. Zamora’s class last semester titled “On Students’ Rights to Their Own Texts: A Model of Teacher Response” by Lil Brannon and C.H. Knoblauch.

 

student-voice

 

I find that I am always coming back to either the aforementioned article, or the notion that students aren’t given a voice as much as they should be. I don’t know about anyone else, but I find that alarming. I am grateful for courses (much like Dr. Zamora’s courses) that are directed in such a way where students do have a say in their education. Purdy and Walker mention this in the article, saying that students can benefit more from having the chance to give feedback regarding the practices they are being taught. However, I didn’t have professors like Dr. Zamora, Dr. Inskeep, Dr. O’Day, or Dr. Sutton for most of my college career; this has definitely worked against me to some extent because I do consider myself to be the type of student to separate all things research oriented in an academic setting from things that I do on a daily basis. I have learned since then that that can be detrimental to me.

I am still coming to terms with my own research identity, and fighting hard every single day to challenge what I know now and have been taught. I don’t think I need to give up everything that I have learned because I was instructed well in some areas and poorly in others. With that being said, I still have bit of work to do in combining it all together. Reading this article only made me more aware of how insecure I am when it comes to research and academia in general. Maybe I feel this way because at some point, I was a student in the very common situation of being told I didn’t really know anything, but that I was there [in college] to learn it the “right” way. Banking concept of education much? There are times I do not believe in myself as much as others have believed in me, but some days I’ll have unbelievable confidence in myself and my researcher identity. It is all very hard to keep up with and balance, and has probably worked against me at some point in my life by now.

The authors of this article are on to something when they say that it is necessary to adopt pedagogies similar to the one Megan Norcia (2007) provides. Norcia notes that it is beneficial for students to engage with resources in a digital context to do primary research in their first year (as cited in Purdy & Walker, 2012). Not only do I agree with this statement, but I also think that it should be carried through until a student graduates and even further. Introducing researcher identity (or the importance of it) briefly in a screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-1-07-51-pmstudent’s first year is not enough. They are sometimes expected, then, in 2nd-4th year classes to already know these “basic” things are and it ends up being detrimental as they move forward (and yes I did forget the question mark on my meme). I am JUST NOW hearing the term researcher identity, learning about what it is, and figuring out what my own identity even is. I knew about a lot of what Purdy and Walker mention in this article, but I didn’t have the terms to express it in the way that they do. It is basically like knowing the issues existed, but not fully letting everything register in my mind because I am still within the issue. I hope that makes sense for all of you. My brain is still churning up there trying to find the right words. I am an English major. I promise!! It almost feels like I am starting over or back tracking even though I know I am only adding to the knowledge that I already possess.

There is so much more that I can address and point out with this article, but I will leave it on that thought. Maybe I have sparked something by now in anyone who is reading this, and I will like to allow time for that thought to sit a while. Moving along to Hypothesis… I really like the tool. I am a millennial. I grew up with technology. However, I have an old soul and I like the tangible experience of actually printing out my documents and writing in the margins so that is what I originally did. Hypothesis is an mazing tool, but it is going to take me some time to warm up to it because I do not like performing that stage of my process online. I feel I am that person who will know about and be able to appreciate the affordance of various technologies, but will use it sparingly in my own personal life. In no way am I knocking the tool, but it just isn’t for me completely; this doesn’t mean that I try to ignore all that it has to offer. I’m picky, I know. I am pretty sure that I will continue to use it now that I know about it, and maybe I’ll end up using it more than I think I will without even noticing.

 

Where am I right now in my search for my presentation day, you ask?

 

Oh boy, this is a loaded question. Honestly, I don’t even know if I know where I am! (I find this comical and saddening at the same time). But I shall not fret. My first thought was similar to Hope’s urge and interest in researching for creative writing. However, I knew that this was very broad. If I am trying to have my thesis be a continuation of my electronic literature creation from last semester, I suppose I am actually grounded in researching about writing/composing poetry. I am also convinced that my interest here is in poetry with historical truth. So does that mean I am interested in researching history, historical lineage, or history of a people? If so, how do I begin to find readings about this? In addition, how do I then begin to tie this into the greater picture of digital literacy and so forth? So, I went to google scholar and typed in “writing poetry”. One of the first results that popped up was actually a book called Radical Artifice: Writing Poetry in the Age of Media. That sounds perfect, and directly tied to what I am trying to get into when it comes to bringing creative works to a digital space. From there, I found five other interesting possible resources. I will have to look into the books and articles more and see if I can use anything from them. Have I possibly stumbled into a breakthrough? I think I can use a bit more guidance, but this is a start!

screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-12-45-05-pm screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-12-50-27-pm screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-12-54-01-pm screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-12-54-39-pm screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-12-54-56-pm

 


Limited Spaces and Research Identity

     Before I begin discussing "Limited Spaces and Research Identity" by James P. Purdy and Joyce R. Walker, I want to comment on the Hypthes.is tool we used this week to annotate.  I LOVED IT! As a student in my undergrad, I loved communicating with a text via writing in the margins. I felt that by interacting this way I was able to better comprehend both the text and my feelings with it.  Even as a teacher, and with my district pushing technology and going paperless, most teachers have been grading using online tools. While I tried some of these, such as commenting on Google Docs, I felt disengaged from their work. I felt that I was an ineffective grader and therefore my students were missing out. I then stopped using these online tools and forced my students to print out their papers, telling myself it was teaching them responsibility, when it was really me shying away from stepping outside of my comfort zone. 
     In addition to grading online, my students are trained in how to annotate a text. I try to make it sound "cool" and "fun" to have a thoroughly marked up text; however, sometimes I'm met with students who simply highlight or color in the margins.  I was discussing this issue with a colleague the week before the semester started and we were saying that we wished we could have our students annotate online and be able to do so in groups. I was thrilled when we were introduced to Hypothes.is thinking this could very well be the tool we use! And it is! I shared it with her and she loved it. I told her that we used it this week when reading an article, and I was able to make even deeper meaning of the text by forming my ideas based off of the reading, but also my classmates comments. Seeing that other classmates felt the same way I did gave me validation, and seeing ones with differing opinions challenged me. I felt like Hypothes.is gave me a safe place to experiment with my opinions. 
     
     This week we used Hypothes.is to explore the article "Limited Spaces and Research Identity" by James P. Purdy and Joyce R. Walker. I was a bit intimidated when I sat down to read, but then I remembered that Stephanie read it by accident the week before, and I heard her talk about how she had to spend time looking up the vocabulary and researching extra to better understand the article. This made me feel loads better, especially as I began to read and thought, "OMG WHAT IS ALL THIS?" 
     As I was reading this article, I had mixed emotions. At the start, the idea of liminality made sense: that inbetween stage of learning or coming to terms with our ideas. I thought that this article would be about coming to terms with yourself as a researcher, but at times it felt like a put down to students who want to be researchers, and truthfully I felt a bit discouraged reading this. The article states, "Being a “good” academic researcher, according to these texts,  requires  students  to  leave  behind  their  existing  identities  as  online researchers. The texts we analyzed imply that for students to succeed as college researchers, they need, in a sense, to abandon their current practices and admit that they do not know how to do research." When I read this I wanted to scream out, "SAYS WHO?" If I was an undergraduate walking into my first composition or research class, and I was told this, I'd walk out crying. I felt this statement was disrespectful and discredited all the hard work I've done to learn how to research. That being said, I can see how people abuse researching on the web, and see it as the easy way out. So maybe instead of abandoning all previous ideas and personas, we can ask ourselves and our classmates to be open to new ways of learning, and be willing to dispose of some of our older ideas.
I was also taken aback, by how adamant this article was against digital research, but nowhere did they discuss how to TEACH using these digital resources. The article seemed to preach more about not using these resources then educating students on HOW to use them. We live in a digital age, and the reality is that as long as the internet is at our finger tips, students are going to use it. The second reality, is that like children, if you tell someone not to do something, the likelihood of them doing it is greater. That being said, let's adopt a stance of teaching digital literacies and common sense. How about giving the students some credit? We are growing up as scholars in this digital age, and the majority of us have grown up using it since we were little kids, so how about you let us grow in this arena?

Limited Spaces and Research Identity

     Before I begin discussing "Limited Spaces and Research Identity" by James P. Purdy and Joyce R. Walker, I want to comment on the Hypthes.is tool we used this week to annotate.  I LOVED IT! As a student in my undergrad, I loved communicating with a text via writing in the margins. I felt that by interacting this way I was able to better comprehend both the text and my feelings with it.  Even as a teacher, and with my district pushing technology and going paperless, most teachers have been grading using online tools. While I tried some of these, such as commenting on Google Docs, I felt disengaged from their work. I felt that I was an ineffective grader and therefore my students were missing out. I then stopped using these online tools and forced my students to print out their papers, telling myself it was teaching them responsibility, when it was really me shying away from stepping outside of my comfort zone. 
     In addition to grading online, my students are trained in how to annotate a text. I try to make it sound "cool" and "fun" to have a thoroughly marked up text; however, sometimes I'm met with students who simply highlight or color in the margins.  I was discussing this issue with a colleague the week before the semester started and we were saying that we wished we could have our students annotate online and be able to do so in groups. I was thrilled when we were introduced to Hypothes.is thinking this could very well be the tool we use! And it is! I shared it with her and she loved it. I told her that we used it this week when reading an article, and I was able to make even deeper meaning of the text by forming my ideas based off of the reading, but also my classmates comments. Seeing that other classmates felt the same way I did gave me validation, and seeing ones with differing opinions challenged me. I felt like Hypothes.is gave me a safe place to experiment with my opinions. 
     
     This week we used Hypothes.is to explore the article "Limited Spaces and Research Identity" by James P. Purdy and Joyce R. Walker. I was a bit intimidated when I sat down to read, but then I remembered that Stephanie read it by accident the week before, and I heard her talk about how she had to spend time looking up the vocabulary and researching extra to better understand the article. This made me feel loads better, especially as I began to read and thought, "OMG WHAT IS ALL THIS?" 
     As I was reading this article, I had mixed emotions. At the start, the idea of liminality made sense: that inbetween stage of learning or coming to terms with our ideas. I thought that this article would be about coming to terms with yourself as a researcher, but at times it felt like a put down to students who want to be researchers, and truthfully I felt a bit discouraged reading this. The article states, "Being a “good” academic researcher, according to these texts,  requires  students  to  leave  behind  their  existing  identities  as  online researchers. The texts we analyzed imply that for students to succeed as college researchers, they need, in a sense, to abandon their current practices and admit that they do not know how to do research." When I read this I wanted to scream out, "SAYS WHO?" If I was an undergraduate walking into my first composition or research class, and I was told this, I'd walk out crying. I felt this statement was disrespectful and discredited all the hard work I've done to learn how to research. That being said, I can see how people abuse researching on the web, and see it as the easy way out. So maybe instead of abandoning all previous ideas and personas, we can ask ourselves and our classmates to be open to new ways of learning, and be willing to dispose of some of our older ideas.
I was also taken aback, by how adamant this article was against digital research, but nowhere did they discuss how to TEACH using these digital resources. The article seemed to preach more about not using these resources then educating students on HOW to use them. We live in a digital age, and the reality is that as long as the internet is at our finger tips, students are going to use it. The second reality, is that like children, if you tell someone not to do something, the likelihood of them doing it is greater. That being said, let's adopt a stance of teaching digital literacies and common sense. How about giving the students some credit? We are growing up as scholars in this digital age, and the majority of us have grown up using it since we were little kids, so how about you let us grow in this arena?