Writing Theories Under Construction



This week we read an excerpt from “Grounded Theory: A Critical Research Methodology” by Joyce Magnotto Neff in Under Construction: Working at the Intersection of Composition Theory, Research, and Practice. It made me think that reflect on why we do the work that we do. What makes us take the theories into practice. The main takeaway from me was the grounded theory methodology. The data driven principals that the methodology is founded on lends itself to the opportunity to test this theory out. Data is important when looking at the trends in writing and trying to find a way to improve both the teaching and the actual doing of writing. 

There is so much guesswork in the teaching of writing instruction because of the complexity of human activity. As a result, I think it is important to have a structured lens in which to look at the data. "Grounded theory methodology insists that no matter how general-- how broad in scope or abstract -- the theory, it should be developed in that back and forth-- interplay with data that is so central to this methodology."  It is in the back and forth approach where I think we find the most important details of the work. In the trial and error of doing and studying we stay grounded in work. This type of work clearly distinguishes the difference between theory and practice. 

The second text, Confronting the Challenges of Participating Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century was a very interesting read. I actually enjoyed this much more than the previous text. This really spoke to me thinking as both a teacher of writing and a graduate student. Even though I can remember a world without the convenance of modern technological advances it is hard for me to remember a time without it. "The computer does not operate in a vacuum. Injecting digital technologies into the classroom necessarily affects our relationships with every other communications." No truer words have been spoken in relation to computers. Today nothing moves without computers-- this is especially true in the world of writing. A revolution of sorts has happened in writing because of the advent of computers. Students have been removed from traditional classroom forums and moved into a world that they are more familiar and comfortable with. 

The term "affinity spaces" emerged in this article and it was like a lightbulb went off in my mind. "Affinity spaces are distinct from formal education systems." Different from the traditional classrooms of the past. And these affinity spaces have made room for students to be participants in their education and this is space that is greatly needed. In these organic spaces students are allowed and are more likely to create and participate. I think the participation is key. In traditional classrooms students are more reluctant to participate to write, to share their ideas for whatever reason. But in this digital space students are more reticent to be involved to give their ideas and to create. 

As an educator I see it when I use technology to engage my students and elicit their participation in a world that is familiar to them. And as a graduate student I am experiencing this in my Networked Narratives class. Being a student in this space navigating through a world that I have become familiar with has enabled me to be an engaged student in a manner that I never would've before. This is the way of the world and I feel that I sit in a very good space to be able to get the perspective of this educational shift from two different spectrums. It has given me so much insight into what is to coming next. 

Composition Theory and Participatory Culture

“Grounded Theory: A Critical Research Methodology” by Joyce Magnotto Neff was the first article of the two that I read in preparation of this response. We went over grounded theory in class briefly, and touched on what it meant to do that kind of research, but there was still so much up in the air about it in general. I feel like I have learned a lot about grounded theory from this article, but in no way was it enjoyable to read. However, as I began, I found it interesting that right in the beginning is where it is mentioned that research studies conducted during the 60s-80s fails to follow up with explanation in terms of the results that come from the data and the rhetorical decisions that went into the methodology. These are important things to think of, and always brings my mind back to a sentiment that my colleague, Katherine, is always alluding to: “How did they get to this?” and why researched didn’t do one thing over another.

I believe it is worthwhile to not only critique what’s happening now, but incite and suggest ideas for change, which is something that is not always present or encouraged. Candace Spigelman, as pointed out int he article, made not of this. Should this just be a given or a standard when it comes to this type of research? Moving along, I felt a little lost with certain theories and concepts presented in this work, especially when it came around to talking about the coding of data etc. (it was a lot to take in). However, I appreciated the “how to” feel of the article despite how overwhelming it was. Grounded theory, as I have learned from this article, is very much summed up as open ended or never ceasing because there is always something to go off of to get to the next thing.

In regards to the second reading, “Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century” by Henry Jenkins, I felt myself drawn to the three problems that are alluded to as the article opens up. Before I get to those problems mentioned, though, I immediately went into the articles with questions as I began to read. I thought to myself if the article mentions or touches on the difficulties when it comes to those individuals who feel a little left out of the culture? This doesn’t necessarily have to be everyone 50 and over because there are student my age who have a hard time with technology (which made me think of the gap issue that is mentioned later as one of the problems). I like how my questions were answered.

I appreciated how Jenkins does not leave the role of teaching these new digital literacies completely to he parents or the school, but rather suggests that it should be distributed (I agree). Most of what a child knows starts at home, so why would this be an exception? Right? I also liked how to article pointed out the limitations when it came to the traditional school setting, and what can happen when students are reaching for more and the education system is sorely lacking in providing it. For as long as I can remember, some of the most powerful work in the world happened outside of the school walls and directly fought against the system. What does that say? It is all of our teacher’s faults, and neither is it the student’s fault.

Technology is at the forefront of almost everything that is done today, and that is evident from this article. What was definitely special was the point in the article where we are brought back to the discussion we hold in our classroom nonstop, and that is about creativity and how important it is in any instance that involves learning. This kind of unique expressions fosters individuals who not only think against the norm, but also challenge what they know to break barriers and discover more than they would have ever imaged. So, tell me why individuals are paying attention to this and trying to add it more to curriculums across the world? Oh right wait I forgot… we need to mass produce worker bees. In the article, it is mentioned that “it matters what tools are available to a culture”, but what is equally important and relevant to note is that it matters “what that culture chooses to do with those tools”. When the tools a system has handed out is now being used to fight that said system… there is probably an issue with the system and something needs to be done.

The participation gap is something that was taking about briefly in my professor’s other course “Digital Storytelling” and the lack of available resources someone has ABSOLUTELY plays a part in what is being seen in these cultures and communities. I don’t think enough attention is being paid to that. The ethical issue is definitely one to highlight, and in no way can I fit everything on this one blog, but with everything being much more open to the public one has to realize the challenges that poses for a group of participants who may not be trained properly for this sort of environment, and the instruction that usually comes from their elders is lost because the elders have no idea whats going on. Lastly, I am grateful for some of the practices that I have personally experienced in place that teach students about transparency online and the need to be more careful, but it is still a very relevant issue to bring up because it is not being enforced everywhere. This section in the article focuses heavily on this topic in relation to gaming, but some of the solutions given by others are a little fuzzy still. I look forward to researching more deeply about this and hopefully sparking more of a conversation outside of the classroom about this.

All in all, the two readings were definitely insightful and add much to responses needed to questions being asked for so long, but everything is a work in progress and all that can be done right now is to hope that conversations about these issues do not cease.


Creating a New Environment 2017-03-18 12:24:00

Hope Wilson
Grounded Theory
A Critical Research Methodology
by Joyce Magnotto Neff




                                                 




                                                       Researching New Studies 

     Out with the old and in with new. In cessation to research " methods we use to generate our predictions and reach our conclusion" have come under question by Joyce Magnotto Neff. James Berlin once encouraged " shaping meditate by language and situated in concrete historical conditions" (1996, 169). He progressed to encourage " researchers to consider" production-based studies, text-based studies, and culture-as-lived activity studies," studies" situated within the institution...that sponsored the examined actives...,[studies that are] related to the ideological-the arena of language, idea, and value" (170) many years ago.

     Now Grounded Theory is being suggested in composition studies. The perception of studies has become a huge concern. It involves multiple data collection, considering what is critical, and reporting methods to provide accuracy and proof of outcomes. It sounds like methods that scientists may use to maintain data for an experiment. "Glaser and Strauss explained it 30 years ago: Joint collection, coding, and analysis of data is the underlying operation [in grounded theory]. The generation of theory, coupled with the notion of theory as process, requires that three operations be done together as much as possible. They should blur and intertwine continually, from the beginning of an investigation to its end. (1967, 43). " documenting all data collected


      My thoughts once were, research was finding as much information on a subject then collectively forming it in a book or in a form of a research paper.  Progress always encourage and inspire change. Neff concludes " As composition matures as a discipline, this state of meta-analysis seems ideal. It promise to interrogate the distinction between theory and practice that limit our current ways of understanding the complex human activities of writing and teaching writing." encouraging accountability. 



Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture:
Media Education for the 21st Century
by Henry Jenkins.

   The Internet is definitely becoming the new form of communicating. Soon there will be no need to encourage your child to look a person in the eye or how to shake one's hand because most transactions will be on line communication. I am inspired to believe that people reaction to the World Wide Web depends on their age and professional development. Culturally speaking I am convinced  "activities become widespread only if the culture also support them, if they fill recurring needs at a particular historical juncture. It matters what tools are available to a culture, but it matters more what that culture chooses to do with those tools." considering their mindset.

     Technology is always evolving and " to encourage youth to develop the skills, knowledge, ethical frameworks, and self confidence needed to be full participants in contemporary culture" is a great way to expose them to new media technology. Encouraging children to venture outside of their community and challenge their social skills is significant to their personal growth. I concur with Henry Jenkins regarding " The new media literacies should be seen as social skills, as ways of interacting within a larger community, and not simply an individualized skill to be used for personal expression." inspiring participatory culture 
     

Creating a New Environment 2017-03-18 12:24:00

Hope Wilson
Grounded Theory
A Critical Research Methodology
by Joyce Magnotto Neff




                                                 




                                                       Researching New Studies 

     Out with the old and in with new. In cessation to research " methods we use to generate our predictions and reach our conclusion" have come under question by Joyce Magnotto Neff. James Berlin once encouraged " shaping meditate by language and situated in concrete historical conditions" (1996, 169). He progressed to encourage " researchers to consider" production-based studies, text-based studies, and culture-as-lived activity studies," studies" situated within the institution...that sponsored the examined actives...,[studies that are] related to the ideological-the arena of language, idea, and value" (170) many years ago.

     Now Grounded Theory is being suggested in composition studies. The perception of studies has become a huge concern. It involves multiple data collection, considering what is critical, and reporting methods to provide accuracy and proof of outcomes. It sounds like methods that scientists may use to maintain data for an experiment. "Glaser and Strauss explained it 30 years ago: Joint collection, coding, and analysis of data is the underlying operation [in grounded theory]. The generation of theory, coupled with the notion of theory as process, requires that three operations be done together as much as possible. They should blur and intertwine continually, from the beginning of an investigation to its end. (1967, 43). " documenting all data collected


      My thoughts once were, research was finding as much information on a subject then collectively forming it in a book or in a form of a research paper.  Progress always encourage and inspire change. Neff concludes " As composition matures as a discipline, this state of meta-analysis seems ideal. It promise to interrogate the distinction between theory and practice that limit our current ways of understanding the complex human activities of writing and teaching writing." encouraging accountability. 



Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture:
Media Education for the 21st Century
by Henry Jenkins.

   The Internet is definitely becoming the new form of communicating. Soon there will be no need to encourage your child to look a person in the eye or how to shake one's hand because most transactions will be on line communication. I am inspired to believe that people reaction to the World Wide Web depends on their age and professional development. Culturally speaking I am convinced  "activities become widespread only if the culture also support them, if they fill recurring needs at a particular historical juncture. It matters what tools are available to a culture, but it matters more what that culture chooses to do with those tools." considering their mindset.

     Technology is always evolving and " to encourage youth to develop the skills, knowledge, ethical frameworks, and self confidence needed to be full participants in contemporary culture" is a great way to expose them to new media technology. Encouraging children to venture outside of their community and challenge their social skills is significant to their personal growth. I concur with Henry Jenkins regarding " The new media literacies should be seen as social skills, as ways of interacting within a larger community, and not simply an individualized skill to be used for personal expression." inspiring participatory culture 
     

Research Methodology and New Media

First: I want to start off with saying that my Hypothes.is wasn't working so unfortunately I wasn't able to comment on the articles!

Second: I chose to start with "The Needed Skills in the New Media Culture" after being frustrated with downloading the one about Grounded Theory. Foreshadowing that article perhaps? Either way, I was immediately hooked. Starting off with minor anecdotes about teenagers who did incredibly things, being motivated by games are fan bases was impressive and powerful.

The article defines "participatory culture" at the start. In essence, it is a strong presence of collaboration and mutual respect with in the realm of sharing and trusting each others contributions. The purpose of this culture is for everyone to feel as if they CAN participate, even if they chose not to. I like this idea of community and this is exactly the kind of culture I hope to foster in my classroom. I was not the student who always had their hand up. I was the silent thinker in the back of the room digesting and processing the information, then forming my own ideas. I will not give participation grades, but I will develop a classroom where everyone's voice is equally heard, if they want it to be.

Later on in the article, they also discuss the positive and critical views of technology in the classroom. The article discusses that the technology exists, that the computer is nothing without it's "user" but what cost is this to the user? I see the benefits of technology and see the benefits of the "old school" methods. I think marrying the two ideas is where we should live as teachers. However, while 57% of teens "could be considered media creators", the other group are abusing their power, or can't hold a conversation face to face because they are glued to the screen.

Affinity Spaces. Informal learning communities where students learn better, are more engaged, and participate more accurately. Bullshit.  Do we live in a Utopian classroom? Unfortunately or fortunately, I am reading this article through the lens of a teacher. I wish more than anything that I could have a classroom that looks like this and is focused around student driven learning based on their desire and connections with others in the technological world. But I am personally offended by this article, feeling as if they are attacking the traditional system. I can't speak for everyone, and I can't speak for all the incoming youth, but I can speak from my experience, and from those of coworkers and friends: that we are raising and cultivating the laziest, most apathetic generation of individuals. Now maybe that is the "systems" fault and the system has failed them ya-da ya-da ya-da, but it infuriates me at the lack of respect that is given to teachers who WANT to teach and make change, but are also employees of this same "system". Okay end rant.

I actually enjoyed the next section of this article, discussing young peoples disinterest in the news and politics because it is conducted over their heads. I completely agree. Current Events class is not longer interesting, because talking about what is happening is no longer satisfying to these youths because they feel they can't do anything about it. And the three core concerns address the problems that arose as I was thinking about students in this culture. Providing computers and free wifi addressed one of the concerns, but brought up another wonderful point: that merely giving people access to technology is not enough. One must be educated in the value of the technology and how it can be used, not abused.  I also found it fascinating when the article discussed transparency. I completely agree that students need to learn how to question the information presented to them, especially in today's world of fake news.

"We may, in the short run, have to accept that cyberspaces ethical norms are in a flux: we are taking part in a prolonged experiment in what happens when one lowers the barriers of entry into a communication landscape." Wow. Powerful. I love the idea that we can conduct all the research we want; we can discuss the pros and cons of this type of technology and media till we are blue in the face but the reality is no one really knows. This is a prolonged experiment and until these youth are reaching their age of retirement, may we never really know the lasting effects this transition has on them.

Grounded Theory a Critical Research Methodology
by Joyce Magnotto Neff

I admit, I looked up the definition of grounded theory. I had some difficulty scrolling through the pdf and was afraid I missed the definition. Turns out I did. What I deduced is that grounded theory is the methodology used to constructed theory that is grounded in the analysis of data.  When I finally was able to zoom out just enough to read it and squint at the same time, I was able to read the article's definition.

One thing that stood out to me was this idea that when practicing grounded theory, you must learn to live without closure. I found this really interesting because individuals today love closure. You see it in every romantic comedy where the girl needs "closure" to something the ex did. Students like a sense of "closure" where they're told what to do or they know what you "want" from them in terms of an assignment. So I was thinking that this type of thinking might prove very difficult for some, but that through exploring this open-endedness would lead to great possibilities.

The article also discussed that grounded theory is rooted in composition studies. There is no separation between research and writing, but they are both important parts of grounded theory. The article details the analytical research involved.

I felt that I understood this article at the start, but then felt like it got either repetitive, or too confusing that I thought it was saying the same thing over and over. I feel like I need clarification between including this method in freshman composition studies.

Research Methodology and New Media

First: I want to start off with saying that my Hypothes.is wasn't working so unfortunately I wasn't able to comment on the articles!

Second: I chose to start with "The Needed Skills in the New Media Culture" after being frustrated with downloading the one about Grounded Theory. Foreshadowing that article perhaps? Either way, I was immediately hooked. Starting off with minor anecdotes about teenagers who did incredibly things, being motivated by games are fan bases was impressive and powerful.

The article defines "participatory culture" at the start. In essence, it is a strong presence of collaboration and mutual respect with in the realm of sharing and trusting each others contributions. The purpose of this culture is for everyone to feel as if they CAN participate, even if they chose not to. I like this idea of community and this is exactly the kind of culture I hope to foster in my classroom. I was not the student who always had their hand up. I was the silent thinker in the back of the room digesting and processing the information, then forming my own ideas. I will not give participation grades, but I will develop a classroom where everyone's voice is equally heard, if they want it to be.

Later on in the article, they also discuss the positive and critical views of technology in the classroom. The article discusses that the technology exists, that the computer is nothing without it's "user" but what cost is this to the user? I see the benefits of technology and see the benefits of the "old school" methods. I think marrying the two ideas is where we should live as teachers. However, while 57% of teens "could be considered media creators", the other group are abusing their power, or can't hold a conversation face to face because they are glued to the screen.

Affinity Spaces. Informal learning communities where students learn better, are more engaged, and participate more accurately. Bullshit.  Do we live in a Utopian classroom? Unfortunately or fortunately, I am reading this article through the lens of a teacher. I wish more than anything that I could have a classroom that looks like this and is focused around student driven learning based on their desire and connections with others in the technological world. But I am personally offended by this article, feeling as if they are attacking the traditional system. I can't speak for everyone, and I can't speak for all the incoming youth, but I can speak from my experience, and from those of coworkers and friends: that we are raising and cultivating the laziest, most apathetic generation of individuals. Now maybe that is the "systems" fault and the system has failed them ya-da ya-da ya-da, but it infuriates me at the lack of respect that is given to teachers who WANT to teach and make change, but are also employees of this same "system". Okay end rant.

I actually enjoyed the next section of this article, discussing young peoples disinterest in the news and politics because it is conducted over their heads. I completely agree. Current Events class is not longer interesting, because talking about what is happening is no longer satisfying to these youths because they feel they can't do anything about it. And the three core concerns address the problems that arose as I was thinking about students in this culture. Providing computers and free wifi addressed one of the concerns, but brought up another wonderful point: that merely giving people access to technology is not enough. One must be educated in the value of the technology and how it can be used, not abused.  I also found it fascinating when the article discussed transparency. I completely agree that students need to learn how to question the information presented to them, especially in today's world of fake news.

"We may, in the short run, have to accept that cyberspaces ethical norms are in a flux: we are taking part in a prolonged experiment in what happens when one lowers the barriers of entry into a communication landscape." Wow. Powerful. I love the idea that we can conduct all the research we want; we can discuss the pros and cons of this type of technology and media till we are blue in the face but the reality is no one really knows. This is a prolonged experiment and until these youth are reaching their age of retirement, may we never really know the lasting effects this transition has on them.

Grounded Theory a Critical Research Methodology
by Joyce Magnotto Neff

I admit, I looked up the definition of grounded theory. I had some difficulty scrolling through the pdf and was afraid I missed the definition. Turns out I did. What I deduced is that grounded theory is the methodology used to constructed theory that is grounded in the analysis of data.  When I finally was able to zoom out just enough to read it and squint at the same time, I was able to read the article's definition.

One thing that stood out to me was this idea that when practicing grounded theory, you must learn to live without closure. I found this really interesting because individuals today love closure. You see it in every romantic comedy where the girl needs "closure" to something the ex did. Students like a sense of "closure" where they're told what to do or they know what you "want" from them in terms of an assignment. So I was thinking that this type of thinking might prove very difficult for some, but that through exploring this open-endedness would lead to great possibilities.

The article also discussed that grounded theory is rooted in composition studies. There is no separation between research and writing, but they are both important parts of grounded theory. The article details the analytical research involved.

I felt that I understood this article at the start, but then felt like it got either repetitive, or too confusing that I thought it was saying the same thing over and over. I feel like I need clarification between including this method in freshman composition studies.

Up and running again!

I am happy we are “back up and running” after what seemed like an especially long respite.  Thank you to Richonda for guiding us through an excellent discussion of the pedagogical articles entitled “Writing in High School/Writing in College: Research Trends and Future Directions” and “’How They Really Talk’: Two Students’ Perspectives On Digital Literacies In The Writing Classroom.”  By selecting these two readings you were all given a thorough glimpse into two distinct research models.  The Addison & McGee article entailed survey work and quantitive evaluation, while the scholarship by Amicucci offered a reference point for all of you regarding “case study’ research and methodology.  I enjoyed our overall discussion which provided many insights and new questions.  Your shared annotation work stands as an additional record of rich discussion.

The second part of class was productive as we “cracked open” the mystery of preparing a research proposal.  By walking through the official research proposal assignment, you all now have a working outline for what a formal research proposal entails.  Next week when we continue our work on your individual proposal preparation, we will discuss first steps in the process of developing a proposal.

Katherine will walk us though two excellent selections next week, highlighting both “grounded theory” as a methodological approach to writing studies research.  In addition, she will also have us consider the connection between “participatory culture” and writing practices.  Please read and blog your reflection on the following two texts (which can also be accessed from our Reading Roster):

“Grounded Theory: A Critical Research Methodology” by Joyce Magnotto Neff in Under Construction: Working at the Intersection of Composition Theory, Research, and Practice (Please note this reading is one chapter in the larger file you have access to via link – Chapter 9, pages 124-135.)

Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century” by Henry Jenkins. (**Please read from page 7 to approximately page 21.)

Looking forward to another great chat about writing studies research next week!

Sincerely,

Dr. Zamora

 

Writing Research Trends & Future Directions

Joanne Addison and James Sharon McGee really picked apart and dissected everything I had been studying researching and learning in my writing instruction professional development classes. Over the past few years the Common Core Standards have taken over the world of education. And now, a little more than five years later there is talk of doing away with it all together. What the CCS ushered in was a new way in which we taught and thought about student writing in terns of their preparedness for college. In a nutshell I learned that our students, especially those coming from an urban school district are not prepared for college writing. 

This information is neither surprising nor shocking. I did find it however, troubling that everyone knows this to be a a fact. "The most highly satisfied faculty are those at the private high school, and the least satisfied those at the urban high school." Why is this? Why is it that we can recognize the disparity but we still even with our studies and our research we can't seem to bridge this gap and send urban high school students ready for a life in academia? Educators, myself included seem to keep sending them to college with a bullseye on them that points to their inequities. 

I do think what can be learned from this particular research study is where the trends are going. What exactly is going to be required of students from the moment they enter high school until the time they graduate from college. The early educators are able to understand and learn how to teach this style of writing effectively, then students will be better able to do it on a higher level. One of the ways in which I think this can be done is if we make all teachers, writing teachers. This means science and social studies teachers are requiring the same level of high quality writing from their students. "In large-scale studies, institutional studies, and our own research, it seems that much of the writing assigned to students across the curriculum does intend to promote deep learning, although very little prepares students for writing beyond the academy." This shows us that there is a void. If we can close this gap and make the writing across the curricula intentionally meaningful with many opportunities for deeper learning students will be able to write for college and beyond. 

Another point that stuck out to me was the idea that the writing done in college does not prepare students for writing done once they're no longer students. The idea that students need to be trained to write memos and send emails is important. Unless you go on to do scholarly writing or stay in the world of academia the analytic essay writing serves no purpose at all.  There seems to be some ideas as to what will happen in the future. "One possibility among many is literary journalism that is rooted in artfully crafted narrative and critical research-based writing." I think that this is a very important writing skill that we should try and teach earlier rather than later. There seems to be so much data that allows us to exactly pinpoint what is not working. We seem to know where the cracks in the foundation lie. Now if can use this knowledge to create quality writing opportunities that hold value to both the instructors and their students then I think we will be well on our way. 







Writing Research Trends & Future Directions

Joanne Addison and James Sharon McGee really picked apart and dissected everything I had been studying researching and learning in my writing instruction professional development classes. Over the past few years the Common Core Standards have taken over the world of education. And now, a little more than five years later there is talk of doing away with it all together. What the CCS ushered in was a new way in which we taught and thought about student writing in terns of their preparedness for college. In a nutshell I learned that our students, especially those coming from an urban school district are not prepared for college writing. 

This information is neither surprising nor shocking. I did find it however, troubling that everyone knows this to be a a fact. "The most highly satisfied faculty are those at the private high school, and the least satisfied those at the urban high school." Why is this? Why is it that we can recognize the disparity but we still even with our studies and our research we can't seem to bridge this gap and send urban high school students ready for a life in academia? Educators, myself included seem to keep sending them to college with a bullseye on them that points to their inequities. 

I do think what can be learned from this particular research study is where the trends are going. What exactly is going to be required of students from the moment they enter high school until the time they graduate from college. The early educators are able to understand and learn how to teach this style of writing effectively, then students will be better able to do it on a higher level. One of the ways in which I think this can be done is if we make all teachers, writing teachers. This means science and social studies teachers are requiring the same level of high quality writing from their students. "In large-scale studies, institutional studies, and our own research, it seems that much of the writing assigned to students across the curriculum does intend to promote deep learning, although very little prepares students for writing beyond the academy." This shows us that there is a void. If we can close this gap and make the writing across the curricula intentionally meaningful with many opportunities for deeper learning students will be able to write for college and beyond. 

Another point that stuck out to me was the idea that the writing done in college does not prepare students for writing done once they're no longer students. The idea that students need to be trained to write memos and send emails is important. Unless you go on to do scholarly writing or stay in the world of academia the analytic essay writing serves no purpose at all.  There seems to be some ideas as to what will happen in the future. "One possibility among many is literary journalism that is rooted in artfully crafted narrative and critical research-based writing." I think that this is a very important writing skill that we should try and teach earlier rather than later. There seems to be so much data that allows us to exactly pinpoint what is not working. We seem to know where the cracks in the foundation lie. Now if can use this knowledge to create quality writing opportunities that hold value to both the instructors and their students then I think we will be well on our way. 







Writing Research Trends & Future Directions

Joanne Addison and James Sharon McGee really picked apart and dissected everything I had been studying researching and learning in my writing instruction professional development classes. Over the past few years the Common Core Standards have taken over the world of education. And now, a little more than five years later there is talk of doing away with it all together. What the CCS ushered in was a new way in which we taught and thought about student writing in terns of their preparedness for college. In a nutshell I learned that our students, especially those coming from an urban school district are not prepared for college writing. 

This information is neither surprising nor shocking. I did find it however, troubling that everyone knows this to be a a fact. "The most highly satisfied faculty are those at the private high school, and the least satisfied those at the urban high school." Why is this? Why is it that we can recognize the disparity but we still even with our studies and our research we can't seem to bridge this gap and send urban high school students ready for a life in academia? Educators, myself included seem to keep sending them to college with a bullseye on them that points to their inequities. 

I do think what can be learned from this particular research study is where the trends are going. What exactly is going to be required of students from the moment they enter high school until the time they graduate from college. The early educators are able to understand and learn how to teach this style of writing effectively, then students will be better able to do it on a higher level. One of the ways in which I think this can be done is if we make all teachers, writing teachers. This means science and social studies teachers are requiring the same level of high quality writing from their students. "In large-scale studies, institutional studies, and our own research, it seems that much of the writing assigned to students across the curriculum does intend to promote deep learning, although very little prepares students for writing beyond the academy." This shows us that there is a void. If we can close this gap and make the writing across the curricula intentionally meaningful with many opportunities for deeper learning students will be able to write for college and beyond. 

Another point that stuck out to me was the idea that the writing done in college does not prepare students for writing done once they're no longer students. The idea that students need to be trained to write memos and send emails is important. Unless you go on to do scholarly writing or stay in the world of academia the analytic essay writing serves no purpose at all.  There seems to be some ideas as to what will happen in the future. "One possibility among many is literary journalism that is rooted in artfully crafted narrative and critical research-based writing." I think that this is a very important writing skill that we should try and teach earlier rather than later. There seems to be so much data that allows us to exactly pinpoint what is not working. We seem to know where the cracks in the foundation lie. Now if can use this knowledge to create quality writing opportunities that hold value to both the instructors and their students then I think we will be well on our way.