Writing Research & Methods 2017-03-03 13:24:00

This week for our readings, we had to read “Writing in High School/Writing in College: Research Trends and Future Directions” by Joanne Addison and Sharon James McGee and “How They Really Talk”: Two Students’ Perspectives On Digital Literacies In The Writing Classroom” by Ann N. Amicucci.  I found that I really enjoyed both texts! Unlike last week, where I struggled through the first texts, I found that I was reading these for enjoyment.
“Writing in High School/Writing in College: Research Trends and Future Directions” by Joanne Addison and Sharon James McGee dealt heavily in the studies conducted about how much importance, time, and emphasis are placed on various student writing in the high school and undergraduate experience. I was surprised by the results some studies yielded, but more so surprised at the types of surveys conducted. The article begins by stating that, “Despite  the  sometimes  contradictory  and  puzzling  results,  we  find the  turn  toward  this  type  of  research  both  a  promising  sign  and  a  cause  for alarm,” which I found refreshing. I knew this wasn’t going to be a cut and dry article about statistics presented. I found that the authors did a wonderful job presenting the information, but letting us draw our own conclusions. For example, the article includes the link to one survey given, and I found that this survey was lacking, to say the least. I was surprised that the Consortium for the Study of Writing in College, which appears to be a reputable and distinguished group, created such lackluster and ambiguous questions. I felt that these questions, as well as the wording of other surveys mentioned later on in the text, were not driven by any real analysis. I felt that the questions should have been more target, more specific, and forced the students upon deeper reflection.
The article also talks about using these surveys to enhance the writing curriculum and grow these emerging writers and prepare them for the world outside of academia. I teach language arts. I believe in the importance of writing and the written word. I am going to school to become a stronger more effective writer. However, this topic of writing and “preparing students for life beyond the academy” still stumps me. My boyfriend is a civil engineer and says one of his favorite courses in college was technical writing, but other than that, he doesn’t see how his writing studies benefited him after college. It makes me wonder if in the high school/undergrad curriculum writing should just focus on your content area, which would place more value on the writing to those who don’t already see the value. How do you address this comment from your peers or friends who don’t see the value in writing studyies?


Writing Research & Methods 2017-03-03 13:24:00

This week for our readings, we had to read “Writing in High School/Writing in College: Research Trends and Future Directions” by Joanne Addison and Sharon James McGee and “How They Really Talk”: Two Students’ Perspectives On Digital Literacies In The Writing Classroom” by Ann N. Amicucci.  I found that I really enjoyed both texts! Unlike last week, where I struggled through the first texts, I found that I was reading these for enjoyment.
“Writing in High School/Writing in College: Research Trends and Future Directions” by Joanne Addison and Sharon James McGee dealt heavily in the studies conducted about how much importance, time, and emphasis are placed on various student writing in the high school and undergraduate experience. I was surprised by the results some studies yielded, but more so surprised at the types of surveys conducted. The article begins by stating that, “Despite  the  sometimes  contradictory  and  puzzling  results,  we  find the  turn  toward  this  type  of  research  both  a  promising  sign  and  a  cause  for alarm,” which I found refreshing. I knew this wasn’t going to be a cut and dry article about statistics presented. I found that the authors did a wonderful job presenting the information, but letting us draw our own conclusions. For example, the article includes the link to one survey given, and I found that this survey was lacking, to say the least. I was surprised that the Consortium for the Study of Writing in College, which appears to be a reputable and distinguished group, created such lackluster and ambiguous questions. I felt that these questions, as well as the wording of other surveys mentioned later on in the text, were not driven by any real analysis. I felt that the questions should have been more target, more specific, and forced the students upon deeper reflection.
The article also talks about using these surveys to enhance the writing curriculum and grow these emerging writers and prepare them for the world outside of academia. I teach language arts. I believe in the importance of writing and the written word. I am going to school to become a stronger more effective writer. However, this topic of writing and “preparing students for life beyond the academy” still stumps me. My boyfriend is a civil engineer and says one of his favorite courses in college was technical writing, but other than that, he doesn’t see how his writing studies benefited him after college. It makes me wonder if in the high school/undergrad curriculum writing should just focus on your content area, which would place more value on the writing to those who don’t already see the value. How do you address this comment from your peers or friends who don’t see the value in writing studyies?