Creating a New Environment 2017-05-01 22:05:00

The Literary, The Humanistic, The Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies
Julia Flanders
What is Digital Humanities and What’s it Doing in English Department?
Mathew G. Kirchenbaum
Hope Wilson








         I have recently began to personally utilizing computers.I actually carry my iPad daily on most days to read and research at my leisure. Just last year I was utilizing computers for school and work related concerns only. I now feel comfortable with my learn knowledge of some applications that I now research, make purchases, and download information when needed. 

       The digital humanity has become a popular concern of many scholars concerning the English department as well as public usage. As soon as I read the first couple of lines I too googled digital humanities and my results where on wikipedia also. The definition is the digital humanities, also known as humanities computing, is a field of study, research, teaching, and invention concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. It is methodological by nature and interdisciplinary in scope. It involves investigation, analysis, synthesis and presentation of information in electronic form. It studies how these media affect the disciplines in which they are used, and what these disciplines have to contribute to our knowledge of computing. There are constant concerns of how to reinvent and improve processes like the success of the project of the “developed and tested standards and best practices for archiving and ensuring future access to computer games, interactive fiction, and virtual communities” providing the users with better applications. Digital humanities are encouraging change in the English Department. It provides options on how to research, teach, invent, and compute. The entire methodology of investigating, analyzing and how we present information in electric form have changed. This change will provide enormous amount of access to needed information and research. Although I consider myself to be “old school” I continue to enjoy going to a physical library and holding books in my hand as I read them. I have adjusted to the internet because it has its convenient. I am engaged in progress and inspired by the technical tools that are presently available to students and willing users. Although we must consider “The recession-era push to do more with less provides motivation for both defensive, retreating shifts (such as elimination of specialized departments and increased class size) and opportunistic ones (such as the creation of online educational programs that arguably serve to expand access and increase educational opportunities even while they help reduce costs). But both shifts reduce the visibility of the individual—reduce the proportionality, we might say, of the individual to the system. This is true whether we are considering the teacher (now an intellectual focal point for an expanding set of educational relationships that might number in the hundreds or thousands per course) or the student (now a proportionally smaller participant in larger and larger classrooms or online learning communities). It is important to note that both retreat and opportunity operate in the same way here: they accept the same structural premises, namely that the individual must be placed in ever greater subordination to a system of interconnections and that the efficiency and scale of the educational operation are the primary measures of its success—a developmental direction mapped out and justified by the logic of industrial technology,” may effect the transition of technology. We must also consider how accurate our look up has to be to receive exactly what we are searching. The library system is more convenient in that aspect. Considering the World Wide Web has enormous amount of information available to the seeker who are  knowledgeable of the process of researching information. We use to know exactly what we were getting in books and in the World Wide Web I am not exactly sure.

Creating a New Environment 2017-05-01 22:05:00

The Literary, The Humanistic, The Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies
Julia Flanders
What is Digital Humanities and What’s it Doing in English Department?
Mathew G. Kirchenbaum
Hope Wilson








         I have recently began to personally utilizing computers.I actually carry my iPad daily on most days to read and research at my leisure. Just last year I was utilizing computers for school and work related concerns only. I now feel comfortable with my learn knowledge of some applications that I now research, make purchases, and download information when needed. 

       The digital humanity has become a popular concern of many scholars concerning the English department as well as public usage. As soon as I read the first couple of lines I too googled digital humanities and my results where on wikipedia also. The definition is the digital humanities, also known as humanities computing, is a field of study, research, teaching, and invention concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. It is methodological by nature and interdisciplinary in scope. It involves investigation, analysis, synthesis and presentation of information in electronic form. It studies how these media affect the disciplines in which they are used, and what these disciplines have to contribute to our knowledge of computing. There are constant concerns of how to reinvent and improve processes like the success of the project of the “developed and tested standards and best practices for archiving and ensuring future access to computer games, interactive fiction, and virtual communities” providing the users with better applications. Digital humanities are encouraging change in the English Department. It provides options on how to research, teach, invent, and compute. The entire methodology of investigating, analyzing and how we present information in electric form have changed. This change will provide enormous amount of access to needed information and research. Although I consider myself to be “old school” I continue to enjoy going to a physical library and holding books in my hand as I read them. I have adjusted to the internet because it has its convenient. I am engaged in progress and inspired by the technical tools that are presently available to students and willing users. Although we must consider “The recession-era push to do more with less provides motivation for both defensive, retreating shifts (such as elimination of specialized departments and increased class size) and opportunistic ones (such as the creation of online educational programs that arguably serve to expand access and increase educational opportunities even while they help reduce costs). But both shifts reduce the visibility of the individual—reduce the proportionality, we might say, of the individual to the system. This is true whether we are considering the teacher (now an intellectual focal point for an expanding set of educational relationships that might number in the hundreds or thousands per course) or the student (now a proportionally smaller participant in larger and larger classrooms or online learning communities). It is important to note that both retreat and opportunity operate in the same way here: they accept the same structural premises, namely that the individual must be placed in ever greater subordination to a system of interconnections and that the efficiency and scale of the educational operation are the primary measures of its success—a developmental direction mapped out and justified by the logic of industrial technology,” may effect the transition of technology. We must also consider how accurate our look up has to be to receive exactly what we are searching. The library system is more convenient in that aspect. Considering the World Wide Web has enormous amount of information available to the seeker who are  knowledgeable of the process of researching information. We use to know exactly what we were getting in books and in the World Wide Web I am not exactly sure.

Creating a New Environment 2017-05-01 22:05:00

The Literary, The Humanistic, The Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies
Julia Flanders
What is Digital Humanities and What’s it Doing in English Department?
Mathew G. Kirchenbaum
Hope Wilson








         I have recently began to personally utilizing computers.I actually carry my iPad daily on most days to read and research at my leisure. Just last year I was utilizing computers for school and work related concerns only. I now feel comfortable with my learn knowledge of some applications that I now research, make purchases, and download information when needed. 

       The digital humanity has become a popular concern of many scholars concerning the English department as well as public usage. As soon as I read the first couple of lines I too googled digital humanities and my results where on wikipedia also. The definition is the digital humanities, also known as humanities computing, is a field of study, research, teaching, and invention concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. It is methodological by nature and interdisciplinary in scope. It involves investigation, analysis, synthesis and presentation of information in electronic form. It studies how these media affect the disciplines in which they are used, and what these disciplines have to contribute to our knowledge of computing. There are constant concerns of how to reinvent and improve processes like the success of the project of the “developed and tested standards and best practices for archiving and ensuring future access to computer games, interactive fiction, and virtual communities” providing the users with better applications. Digital humanities are encouraging change in the English Department. It provides options on how to research, teach, invent, and compute. The entire methodology of investigating, analyzing and how we present information in electric form have changed. This change will provide enormous amount of access to needed information and research. Although I consider myself to be “old school” I continue to enjoy going to a physical library and holding books in my hand as I read them. I have adjusted to the internet because it has its convenient. I am engaged in progress and inspired by the technical tools that are presently available to students and willing users. Although we must consider “The recession-era push to do more with less provides motivation for both defensive, retreating shifts (such as elimination of specialized departments and increased class size) and opportunistic ones (such as the creation of online educational programs that arguably serve to expand access and increase educational opportunities even while they help reduce costs). But both shifts reduce the visibility of the individual—reduce the proportionality, we might say, of the individual to the system. This is true whether we are considering the teacher (now an intellectual focal point for an expanding set of educational relationships that might number in the hundreds or thousands per course) or the student (now a proportionally smaller participant in larger and larger classrooms or online learning communities). It is important to note that both retreat and opportunity operate in the same way here: they accept the same structural premises, namely that the individual must be placed in ever greater subordination to a system of interconnections and that the efficiency and scale of the educational operation are the primary measures of its success—a developmental direction mapped out and justified by the logic of industrial technology,” may effect the transition of technology. We must also consider how accurate our look up has to be to receive exactly what we are searching. The library system is more convenient in that aspect. Considering the World Wide Web has enormous amount of information available to the seeker who are  knowledgeable of the process of researching information. We use to know exactly what we were getting in books and in the World Wide Web I am not exactly sure.

Blog 10: Digital Humanities Place in English

This topic is actually a portion of what I’m incorporating into my thesis. With all the concerns we have in the digital sphere of learning, there’s a lot to gain for the English departments across the country and the world. Twitter and other sites as mentioned in the “What is Digital Humanities and What’s it doing in English Departments?” article have gotten people to express themselves through writing and other new ways of communication.

The digital sphere as we’ve heard time and time again allows for students to have a feedback audience quicker and more substantive than just their professor and classmates. The choice of blogging with photos, colors and designs also makes students extra excited to start writing their responses to articles. It also helps more reserved and quiet students out in the network sharing their ideas and points with the world.

There is also a lot of resistance from longtime educators who are used to doing things a certain way and see that this digital sphere is a threat to how things should be in their eyes. This field needs people to be bold and take this risk of taking on this whole new sphere of learning. Overall this will keep modern students completely engaged in their English classes than the typical class of today. Some classes have resorted to abolishing the use of digital devices while in the classroom but as technology is expanding and more used this will do more harm than good in ensuring classroom engagement. Digital humanities is the answer to keeping students engaged and motivated to continue learning.


Humanity in a Digital World


It is no secret that we live in a digital world. This digital world we live in is a massive. It has become a part of our reality that we exist in every day. The articles we read this week What is Digital Humanities and What's it Doing in English Departments? by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum and The Literary, the Humanities, the Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies gave a very interesting perspective into this particular area of study. 

All semester I had heard Dr. Zamora mention this term Digital Humanities but I really didn't understand what it meant. So I was very pleased to have the opportunity to learn more about it through these works. Initially, my first takeaway from the Kirschenbaum article was this visual image of humans in the digital world. 

 
via GIPHY

As a middle school english teacher it never dawned on me that digital humanities was not welcomed in an English classroom. I welcome the opportunities to bring my class into the world. But I can see how some areas of academia would be hesitant to accept this. Even though Digital Humanities was shaping up to the be next big thing. There were about five points laid out as reasons why there is resistance to this movement. There is no denying that , "...the digital humanities is about a scholarship and a pedagogy that are collaborative and spend on networks of people and that live in an active life online." (Kirschenbaum 60) We no longer live life and/or learn in isolation. We are connected learners. I lived this first hand in my Networked Narratives class. One of my professors was not physically in the class yet we have had active meaningful and academic discussion via online networks such as Twitter, Hypothesis, Blogs etc. 

 Kirschenbaum ended is article by asking this question, "Isn't that something you want in your English department?"I found myself answering with an unequivocal yes.

Humanity in a Digital World


It is no secret that we live in a digital world. This digital world we live in is a massive. It has become a part of our reality that we exist in every day. The articles we read this week What is Digital Humanities and What's it Doing in English Departments? by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum and The Literary, the Humanities, the Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies gave a very interesting perspective into this particular area of study. 

All semester I had heard Dr. Zamora mention this term Digital Humanities but I really didn't understand what it meant. So I was very pleased to have the opportunity to learn more about it through these works. Initially, my first takeaway from the Kirschenbaum article was this visual image of humans in the digital world. 

 
via GIPHY

As a middle school english teacher it never dawned on me that digital humanities was not welcomed in an English classroom. I welcome the opportunities to bring my class into the world. But I can see how some areas of academia would be hesitant to accept this. Even though Digital Humanities was shaping up to the be next big thing. There were about five points laid out as reasons why there is resistance to this movement. There is no denying that , "...the digital humanities is about a scholarship and a pedagogy that are collaborative and spend on networks of people and that live in an active life online." (Kirschenbaum 60) We no longer live life and/or learn in isolation. We are connected learners. I lived this first hand in my Networked Narratives class. One of my professors was not physically in the class yet we have had active meaningful and academic discussion via online networks such as Twitter, Hypothesis, Blogs etc. 

 Kirschenbaum ended is article by asking this question, "Isn't that something you want in your English department?"I found myself answering with an unequivocal yes.

Direction and a Sigh of Relief

Of the articles assigned for today, "What is Digital Humanities and What's It Doing in English Departments?" by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum was the most meaningful for me.  Even though it was meant as more of an overview of the field, it has helped me to realize exactly where Digital Humanities is situated, what resources are available to scholars of it, and how much of a history it has.  That stuff may be more common-sense or basic knowledge to others, but through my thesis I've kind of been thrown serendipitously into the field of Digital Humanities.  Just a few months ago, all I knew was that I had an idea to study original species communities, and I wasn't even sure if that was "allowed."  I've only just begun to realize that Digital Humanities a thing, and this article said to me "Katherine, it's not just a thing; it's a serious thing.  Studying your original species stuff is SO allowed."  I have this weird habit of assuming that anything I'm passionate about can't be a serious or valid field of study; I don't know why.  This article made me feel like I'm not just trying to take something silly and say "But, wait, look!  There's value to it.  Just hold on like 2 seconds!"  Now I'm joining a community of scholars with conferences, journals, institutes, and a heritage.  Dr. Zamora has helped me to realize the value of my research interests too, but somehow reading it in an article has made it more "real."  This article also gives me hope about my academic future.  Maybe I don't need to restrict myself to trying to beg my way into a Composition and Rhetoric PhD program; instead, there might be digital Humanties programs actually begging to get their hands on me!

Additionally, this article presented info that I can use in my Lit Review and continuing work on my thesis.  Now I have some starting points of where to direct my research (and maybe even where to present it one day!) instead of just casting a net into the databases and Google Scholar to see what bites like I have been.  Most notably, it introduced me to the Library of Congress's "Preserving Digital Worlds" project.  What a great springboard!    


Direction and a Sigh of Relief

Of the articles assigned for today, "What is Digital Humanities and What's It Doing in English Departments?" by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum was the most meaningful for me.  Even though it was meant as more of an overview of the field, it has helped me to realize exactly where Digital Humanities is situated, what resources are available to scholars of it, and how much of a history it has.  That stuff may be more common-sense or basic knowledge to others, but through my thesis I've kind of been thrown serendipitously into the field of Digital Humanities.  Just a few months ago, all I knew was that I had an idea to study original species communities, and I wasn't even sure if that was "allowed."  I've only just begun to realize that Digital Humanities a thing, and this article said to me "Katherine, it's not just a thing; it's a serious thing.  Studying your original species stuff is SO allowed."  I have this weird habit of assuming that anything I'm passionate about can't be a serious or valid field of study; I don't know why.  This article made me feel like I'm not just trying to take something silly and say "But, wait, look!  There's value to it.  Just hold on like 2 seconds!"  Now I'm joining a community of scholars with conferences, journals, institutes, and a heritage.  Dr. Zamora has helped me to realize the value of my research interests too, but somehow reading it in an article has made it more "real."  This article also gives me hope about my academic future.  Maybe I don't need to restrict myself to trying to beg my way into a Composition and Rhetoric PhD program; instead, there might be digital Humanties programs actually begging to get their hands on me!

Additionally, this article presented info that I can use in my Lit Review and continuing work on my thesis.  Now I have some starting points of where to direct my research (and maybe even where to present it one day!) instead of just casting a net into the databases and Google Scholar to see what bites like I have been.  Most notably, it introduced me to the Library of Congress's "Preserving Digital Worlds" project.  What a great springboard!    


Digital Humanities

What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?
By Matthew G. Kirschenbaum

The article “What is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum was incredibly insightful. As a reader, it was easy to read because it was so easy to follow. Not knowing much about digital humanities myself, I appreciated the selection of this article as well as it being the first one listed. I felt that the article did a wonderful job of detailing digital humanities and the evolution from its creation to what it is now. I enjoyed the discussion of the name and the idea of “humanities” being more front and center than it was. I also really enjoyed the Wikipedia comment and how that definition essentially nails the term.
One thing I found interesting was the discussion of digital humanities at the  2009 MLA Annual Convention in Philadelphia. The text states, “Amid all the doom and gloom of the 2009 MLA Convention, one field seems to be alive and well: the digital humanities. More than that: Among all the contending subfields, the digital humanities seem like the first ‘next big thing’ in a long time (Kirschenbaum). I was wondering what the “doom and gloom” is in reference too. I was also surprised that it appeared digital humanities was accepted so openly that I wondered about some common issues, which the author brings up later in relation to collaboration amongst teachers and the outdated sensation of privacy in sharing materials.
Digital Humanities also began taking shape with the invention of Twitter. Twitter, which the article humorously mentions is not just for the ADHD population who can’t be bothered to compose more than a handful of words, but was a way to teach effective communication skills, especially using wit in a short amount of characters. At the 2009 MLA convention, 48% of the attendees at the digital Humanities conference were tweeting. Digital humanities is a culture that values connection to wider issues and collaboration amongst individuals. It fosters the idea of sharing resources and ideas, along with building a community. Brian Croxall, Emory PhD was able to publish his paper through blogs and interactive communities, when he was not able to attend a conference. As a teacher myself, I think resources like these, such as Twitter, or so important in our world today. The element of communication is elevated through these resources. I recently attended professional development with Kelly Gallagher, teacher and author of many professional texts, who mentioned kids vested interests with communication with others from different areas and all they can learn from each other.

The Literary, the Humanistic, the Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies

Julia Flanders

The second text, “The LIterary, the Humanistic, the Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies” by Julia Flanders,  discusses  the “crisis in humanities and the intervention that the specifically digital humanities might make in that crisis” (Flanders).  The article appears to be an introduction to the large volume of essays composed on digital literacy.   While I enjoyed reading the first article, I found this one to be a bit confusing. I felt that I had to keep going back and rereading to clarify what was being said, and even then, I found it difficult to focus.  Overall, I found that this article could have gotten the point across more had they used more relatable terms and a simpler way form of expression.

But here’s what I did get from the text: The article suggests that we must recognize digital humanities must engage with change  driven by institutional and economic forces. However, it warns about both retreating and opportunistic shifts where the individual is not considered and ends up lost in a web of of the system. What I gleaned from this article, is that through digital humanities we can take students outside of their small hub of learning, and take them outside the classroom.

Digital Humanities

What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?
By Matthew G. Kirschenbaum

The article “What is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum was incredibly insightful. As a reader, it was easy to read because it was so easy to follow. Not knowing much about digital humanities myself, I appreciated the selection of this article as well as it being the first one listed. I felt that the article did a wonderful job of detailing digital humanities and the evolution from its creation to what it is now. I enjoyed the discussion of the name and the idea of “humanities” being more front and center than it was. I also really enjoyed the Wikipedia comment and how that definition essentially nails the term.
One thing I found interesting was the discussion of digital humanities at the  2009 MLA Annual Convention in Philadelphia. The text states, “Amid all the doom and gloom of the 2009 MLA Convention, one field seems to be alive and well: the digital humanities. More than that: Among all the contending subfields, the digital humanities seem like the first ‘next big thing’ in a long time (Kirschenbaum). I was wondering what the “doom and gloom” is in reference too. I was also surprised that it appeared digital humanities was accepted so openly that I wondered about some common issues, which the author brings up later in relation to collaboration amongst teachers and the outdated sensation of privacy in sharing materials.
Digital Humanities also began taking shape with the invention of Twitter. Twitter, which the article humorously mentions is not just for the ADHD population who can’t be bothered to compose more than a handful of words, but was a way to teach effective communication skills, especially using wit in a short amount of characters. At the 2009 MLA convention, 48% of the attendees at the digital Humanities conference were tweeting. Digital humanities is a culture that values connection to wider issues and collaboration amongst individuals. It fosters the idea of sharing resources and ideas, along with building a community. Brian Croxall, Emory PhD was able to publish his paper through blogs and interactive communities, when he was not able to attend a conference. As a teacher myself, I think resources like these, such as Twitter, or so important in our world today. The element of communication is elevated through these resources. I recently attended professional development with Kelly Gallagher, teacher and author of many professional texts, who mentioned kids vested interests with communication with others from different areas and all they can learn from each other.

The Literary, the Humanistic, the Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies

Julia Flanders

The second text, “The LIterary, the Humanistic, the Digital: Toward a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies” by Julia Flanders,  discusses  the “crisis in humanities and the intervention that the specifically digital humanities might make in that crisis” (Flanders).  The article appears to be an introduction to the large volume of essays composed on digital literacy.   While I enjoyed reading the first article, I found this one to be a bit confusing. I felt that I had to keep going back and rereading to clarify what was being said, and even then, I found it difficult to focus.  Overall, I found that this article could have gotten the point across more had they used more relatable terms and a simpler way form of expression.

But here’s what I did get from the text: The article suggests that we must recognize digital humanities must engage with change  driven by institutional and economic forces. However, it warns about both retreating and opportunistic shifts where the individual is not considered and ends up lost in a web of of the system. What I gleaned from this article, is that through digital humanities we can take students outside of their small hub of learning, and take them outside the classroom.