All posts by Quanesha Burr

Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-04-11 18:57:00

In chapter four Social Languages, Conversations, and Intertextuality in An Introduction to Discourse Analysis Theory and Method by James Paul Gee I really liked Section Two Social Languages. Not only did that part remind me of a classroom discussion in New Media Studies, but it also made me realize how easy it is to not notice changes in your own personality. Sometimes, I think people do not want to admit they change and other times not realizing the change makes sense. The changes can be so subtle. If I performed the experiment described, I think my changes would not be that noticeable.  But, I do think my word choice would change slightly. Unlike Jane, I would be less proper with my parents. The only explanation I can come up with is the fact I am more comfortable with my parents. I am comfortable because I know my parents would not judge me, if my grammar is not correct, or think less of me.
In addition I also thought it was interesting the chapter said, “we tend to think of writing, at least academic writing, as clear, unambiguous, and explicit in comparison to speech, . . . .” (Gee 51). I have experienced the complete opposite. Like I mentioned in class, teachers have understood my speech more at times, and teachers have made me realize it depends on who is writing and the purpose of their writing. Some people write to be understood while others write to sound and appear intelligent. But the same can be said with speech, like Dr. Zamora clearly told us one day in class. So, once again it all depends on the person.
Moreover, all the different ways Gee tried to interpret a sentence makes me think about why I love hearing people’s opinions. I love hearing different interpretations and statements that make me think. I see in my poetry class alone just how amazing our minds are and how we can take a simple image or word and transform it into something amazing or unique.


Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-04-11 18:57:00

In chapter four Social Languages, Conversations, and Intertextuality in An Introduction to Discourse Analysis Theory and Method by James Paul Gee I really liked Section Two Social Languages. Not only did that part remind me of a classroom discussion in New Media Studies, but it also made me realize how easy it is to not notice changes in your own personality. Sometimes, I think people do not want to admit they change and other times not realizing the change makes sense. The changes can be so subtle. If I performed the experiment described, I think my changes would not be that noticeable.  But, I do think my word choice would change slightly. Unlike Jane, I would be less proper with my parents. The only explanation I can come up with is the fact I am more comfortable with my parents. I am comfortable because I know my parents would not judge me, if my grammar is not correct, or think less of me.
In addition I also thought it was interesting the chapter said, “we tend to think of writing, at least academic writing, as clear, unambiguous, and explicit in comparison to speech, . . . .” (Gee 51). I have experienced the complete opposite. Like I mentioned in class, teachers have understood my speech more at times, and teachers have made me realize it depends on who is writing and the purpose of their writing. Some people write to be understood while others write to sound and appear intelligent. But the same can be said with speech, like Dr. Zamora clearly told us one day in class. So, once again it all depends on the person.
Moreover, all the different ways Gee tried to interpret a sentence makes me think about why I love hearing people’s opinions. I love hearing different interpretations and statements that make me think. I see in my poetry class alone just how amazing our minds are and how we can take a simple image or word and transform it into something amazing or unique.


Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-04-04 19:17:00

In Developing a Definition of Teacher Research, I liked the quote used in the beginning by Marion MacLean. MacLean says, “Teacher researchers have faith in their students; they know too much to give up on them” (23). This statement automatically made me think of all the wonderful teachers that saw potential within me, and did not “give up” on me even when I sometimes wanted to “give up” on myself (23). Those are the teachers that make a difference and leave an impact.
In addition, I liked how The Teacher as Researcher by Marian M. Mohr started off as well. Right from the jump, it brought me back to a classroom discussion and it showed the benefits of keeping a journal. I liked the idea of a journal possibly being used as a tool for yourself and strangers if the author considers it to be research and publishes it.
Continuing, the article actually relieved some of my fears about becoming a teacher. Mohr says, “The humiliation of not knowing everything catches up with every teacher” (5). This further highlights the saying “we all make mistakes,” and the fact we can never know everything. In Mohr case, the mistake actually did more good than harm. Mohr found a way to make the students recall a word and taught through the mistake. As teachers, you have to sometimes teach creatively to help your students learn and be engaged. Although I am not a teacher, I am sure there are days when nothing goes as planned, and you engage in something out of the usual.

In conclusion, Developing a Definition of Teacher Research and The Teacher as Researcher were more interesting to me than A Teacher-Research Group in Action although I do like the idea of trying to demonstrate a “group in action” (2). I also like the fact the article incorporated different people’s perspectives of the experience and it incorporated techniques that I personally enjoy. The reading also made me think of The Future of Composition Research because it mentioned “the process [being] more important than the product” (5).Although I still focus on the product, what you learn and who you become are important. 

Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-04-04 19:17:00

In Developing a Definition of Teacher Research, I liked the quote used in the beginning by Marion MacLean. MacLean says, “Teacher researchers have faith in their students; they know too much to give up on them” (23). This statement automatically made me think of all the wonderful teachers that saw potential within me, and did not “give up” on me even when I sometimes wanted to “give up” on myself (23). Those are the teachers that make a difference and leave an impact.
In addition, I liked how The Teacher as Researcher by Marian M. Mohr started off as well. Right from the jump, it brought me back to a classroom discussion and it showed the benefits of keeping a journal. I liked the idea of a journal possibly being used as a tool for yourself and strangers if the author considers it to be research and publishes it.
Continuing, the article actually relieved some of my fears about becoming a teacher. Mohr says, “The humiliation of not knowing everything catches up with every teacher” (5). This further highlights the saying “we all make mistakes,” and the fact we can never know everything. In Mohr case, the mistake actually did more good than harm. Mohr found a way to make the students recall a word and taught through the mistake. As teachers, you have to sometimes teach creatively to help your students learn and be engaged. Although I am not a teacher, I am sure there are days when nothing goes as planned, and you engage in something out of the usual.

In conclusion, Developing a Definition of Teacher Research and The Teacher as Researcher were more interesting to me than A Teacher-Research Group in Action although I do like the idea of trying to demonstrate a “group in action” (2). I also like the fact the article incorporated different people’s perspectives of the experience and it incorporated techniques that I personally enjoy. The reading also made me think of The Future of Composition Research because it mentioned “the process [being] more important than the product” (5).Although I still focus on the product, what you learn and who you become are important. 

Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-03-28 17:54:00


Out of the choices we had to read for today, I liked Yancey’s piece the best. To begin, in Yancey’s Theory, Practice, and the Bridge between the Methods Course and Reflective Rhetoric I liked the idea she had of “tasks that resemble ‘real’ teaching . . . that to complete them one acts as (in the process of becoming) a teacher” (235). What came to my mind after reading that is students having to teach themselves a lesson then complete the homework assigned. I did this for a grammar class I was unable to attend, due to a storm that left me stuck in another state, and I was really surprised that I understood and did well on the homework. In a way, it can also be compared to the discussion lead/the written portion Dr. Zamora has us do. In addition, like Yancey mentioned this also made me think of collaboration. For example, one student may understand a lesson and explains it to another student. Furthermore while reading Yancey’s article, I felt like some of the information or suggestions she presented my teachers already do, and I also recalled other readings from last semester. I appreciated the fact she also liked the idea of students taking peers work home like Jaxon.

Continuing in Historical Review: Issues in Rhetorical Invention in Janice Lauer’s Invention in Rhetoric and Composition, I agree with a statement Carter makes. “Carter maintained that later, especially in the Roman period, the development of status, identifying the point at issue, offered a way for the rhetor to gain some control over the moment” (14). I think this statement can be applied to now, and it automatically took me back to my debate class. In order to have a strong argument, everything you said should have been supported by experts. If it did, not only did you but the audience felt like your argument was more valid. In my class, our opinion alone was not good enough because we did not have status or expertise. Sometimes, expertise leads to status. Although I think Historical Reviewwas difficult to read, I think some of the people mentioned had really interesting things to say.

Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-03-28 17:54:00


Out of the choices we had to read for today, I liked Yancey’s piece the best. To begin, in Yancey’s Theory, Practice, and the Bridge between the Methods Course and Reflective Rhetoric I liked the idea she had of “tasks that resemble ‘real’ teaching . . . that to complete them one acts as (in the process of becoming) a teacher” (235). What came to my mind after reading that is students having to teach themselves a lesson then complete the homework assigned. I did this for a grammar class I was unable to attend, due to a storm that left me stuck in another state, and I was really surprised that I understood and did well on the homework. In a way, it can also be compared to the discussion lead/the written portion Dr. Zamora has us do. In addition, like Yancey mentioned this also made me think of collaboration. For example, one student may understand a lesson and explains it to another student. Furthermore while reading Yancey’s article, I felt like some of the information or suggestions she presented my teachers already do, and I also recalled other readings from last semester. I appreciated the fact she also liked the idea of students taking peers work home like Jaxon.

Continuing in Historical Review: Issues in Rhetorical Invention in Janice Lauer’s Invention in Rhetoric and Composition, I agree with a statement Carter makes. “Carter maintained that later, especially in the Roman period, the development of status, identifying the point at issue, offered a way for the rhetor to gain some control over the moment” (14). I think this statement can be applied to now, and it automatically took me back to my debate class. In order to have a strong argument, everything you said should have been supported by experts. If it did, not only did you but the audience felt like your argument was more valid. In my class, our opinion alone was not good enough because we did not have status or expertise. Sometimes, expertise leads to status. Although I think Historical Reviewwas difficult to read, I think some of the people mentioned had really interesting things to say.

Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-03-14 19:09:00

The first reading Grounded Theory a Critical Research Methodology by Joyce Magnotto Neff was okay. What I did like about it is the fact it bought up the idea of integration again and it also made me think about Predictor Variables the Future of Composition Research right from the beginning. The statement “What we have not done as prolifically or as well is to account for the methods we use to generate our predictions and reach our conclusions” made me think about the word process (Neff 124). Johanek talks about process in Predictor Variables. Furthermore, I also liked the idea of “conferring with others about the ‘fit’ of my emerging findings” (Neff 130). Sometimes, we learn more from collaboration, and a researcher will feel more confident about his/her results. Lastly, the most important point I think this article highlighted and what I am beginning to realize is you “must learn to live without closure” (Neff 126). Dr. Zamora mentioned this in one of our classroom discussions when she said things are not black and white, and I just shared a statement recently on Facebook that is very similar.
The next article The Process Approach to Writing Instruction Examining Its Effectivenessby Ruie J. Pritchard and Ronald L. Honeycutt was just another discussion we had in class. Based off of our discussion, I think a lot of us will agree with Brozick
the writing process is much more dynamic and is contingent upon numerous variables and influences such as purpose, audience, type of writing, and the writer’s personality type. (qtd. in Pritchard and Honeycutt 277)
I can mention several experiences in which this statement has proven itself to be true. In addition, I also liked Peter Elbow’s contribution because it took me back to my senior year of college and reminded me of a comment a teacher made to me.




Comp Studies Research & Methods 2016-03-14 19:09:00

The first reading Grounded Theory a Critical Research Methodology by Joyce Magnotto Neff was okay. What I did like about it is the fact it bought up the idea of integration again and it also made me think about Predictor Variables the Future of Composition Research right from the beginning. The statement “What we have not done as prolifically or as well is to account for the methods we use to generate our predictions and reach our conclusions” made me think about the word process (Neff 124). Johanek talks about process in Predictor Variables. Furthermore, I also liked the idea of “conferring with others about the ‘fit’ of my emerging findings” (Neff 130). Sometimes, we learn more from collaboration, and a researcher will feel more confident about his/her results. Lastly, the most important point I think this article highlighted and what I am beginning to realize is you “must learn to live without closure” (Neff 126). Dr. Zamora mentioned this in one of our classroom discussions when she said things are not black and white, and I just shared a statement recently on Facebook that is very similar.
The next article The Process Approach to Writing Instruction Examining Its Effectivenessby Ruie J. Pritchard and Ronald L. Honeycutt was just another discussion we had in class. Based off of our discussion, I think a lot of us will agree with Brozick
the writing process is much more dynamic and is contingent upon numerous variables and influences such as purpose, audience, type of writing, and the writer’s personality type. (qtd. in Pritchard and Honeycutt 277)
I can mention several experiences in which this statement has proven itself to be true. In addition, I also liked Peter Elbow’s contribution because it took me back to my senior year of college and reminded me of a comment a teacher made to me.